BUILDING GOD'S KINGDOM...

...TO THE GLORY OF JESUS CHRIST!


FHK's Part:

With an established church in the San Juan village, but several outer villages in need of Jesus, we focused on those villages until the Pastor who had been in San Juan for a number of years was called by God to another ministry.  When Crispin and Brenda left, FHK took over pastoring the church in San Juan while looking for a full time pastor.  We continue to search for a native Honduran to pastor the church in San Juan, and have a partnership with a Honduran church to bring in one of their pastors when cross-cultural training has been completed.  Please pray that all goes well with this transition!

So what now?:

FHK is now back to it's focus of using San Juan as a base to disciple the believers there and bring the gospel of Jesus Christ to the outer unchurched / unreached villages.  While doing this we maintain several programs in the San Juan region under chief Sipriano.  These projects and programs include feeding program during the dry season using Manna Pack¬© Rice Boxes from Feed My Starving Children, Emergency and Critical Medical Aid, the Tolupan Men's Bible Study and Tool group, the San Juan widows program of assistance and Medical / Medicinal supply to the San Juan clinic.  We also have constructed several small cinder-block buildings in San Juan to store supplies in and rebuilt Chief Sipriano's house (now deceased - widow "Lidia" lives there). Chief Sipriano was very elderly and he was the backbone of the movement toward Jesus in the mountain, but the new chief ("Tacho") continues this work.

Remote Ministry - The Tolpan Tribe 

The Tolpan:

The Tolpan people ("Tolupan" also) are located in the central highlands of Honduras, where they have been since the conquistadors entered the country.  They formerly occupied the entire central portion of the country from the Caribbean down to the Nicaraguan border, but only a handful remain.  The remaining population lives as some of the poorest of Honduras - a country filled with poverty.  They range from slightly to severely malnourished, with some dying each year from starvation.  They have been remote and very difficult to reach, however the route is becoming more and more accessible, bringing in more and more pressure to bear from the Latin population on this fragile culture.

With the New Testament translation in 1996 the church in San Juan was firmly established, however the outer, upper villages remain largely unevangelized.